The Black Death 1346 1353

The Black Death  1346 1353 PDF Book Detail:
Author: Ole Jørgen Benedictow
Publisher: Boydell Press
ISBN: 1843832143
Size: 66.60 MB
Format: PDF
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 433
View: 6617

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Book Description: The first paperback edition of this unique and shocking guide to the Black Death in Europe.

Der Schwarze Tod In Europa

Der Schwarze Tod in Europa PDF Book Detail:
Author: Klaus Bergdolt
Publisher: C.H.Beck
ISBN: 3406628850
Size: 24.10 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category : History
Languages : de
Pages : 272
View: 5972

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Book Description: Zwischen 1346 und 1350 erlag etwa ein Drittel der europäischen Bevölkerung der Pest, die sich von der Krim aus nach Westen ausbreitete. Erst das 20. Jahrhundert sah vergleichbare Katastrophen. Klaus Bergdolt bietet ein umfassendes Bild des "Schwarzen Todes", der Europa verändert hat wie danach erst wieder die Weltkriege unserer Zeit. Nach einem Rückblick auf die Seuchen der Antike und des frühen Mittelalters und eine Einführung in die medizinische Problematik stellt Klaus Bergdolt mithilfe zeitgenössischer Chronisten den Seuchenalltag dar. Dann analysiert er die Begleitphänomene des Schwarzen Todes wie Geißlerzüge und Judenpogrome und zeigt schließlich den Einfluss der Pest auf Kunst und Literatur des Spätmittelalters.

What Disease Was Plague

What Disease was Plague  PDF Book Detail:
Author: Ole Jørgen Benedictow
Publisher: Brill Academic Publishers
ISBN: 9789004180024
Size: 39.98 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category : Health & Fitness
Languages : en
Pages : 746
View: 1787

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Book Description: In this monograph, the alternative theories to the established bubonic-plague theory as to the microbiological identity of historical plague epidemics are intensively discussed in the light of the historical sources and the medical primary research and standard works.

The Black Death

The Black Death PDF Book Detail:
Author: Charles River
Publisher: CreateSpace
ISBN: 9781502753991
Size: 51.56 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 34
View: 1840

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Book Description: *Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the plague written by survivors across Europe *Includes a bibliography for further reading "The trend of recent research is pointing to a figure more like 45-50% of the European population dying during a four-year period. There is a fair amount of geographic variation. In Mediterranean Europe, areas such as Italy, the south of France and Spain, where plague ran for about four years consecutively, it was probably closer to 75-80% of the population. In Germany and England ... it was probably closer to 20%.." - Philip Daileader, medieval historian If it is true that nothing succeeds like success, then it is equally true that nothing challenges like change. People have historically been creatures of habit and curiosity at the same time, two parts of the human condition that constantly conflict with each other. This has always been true, but at certain moments in history it has been abundantly true, especially during the mid-14th century, when a boon in exploration and travel came up against a fear of the unknown. Together, they both introduced the Black Death to Europe and led to mostly incorrect attempts to explain it. The Late Middle Ages had seen a rise in Western Europe's population in previous centuries, but these gains were almost entirely erased as the plague spread rapidly across all of Europe from 1346-1353. With a medieval understanding of medicine, diagnosis, and illness, nobody understood what caused Black Death or how to truly treat it. As a result, many religious people assumed it was divine retribution, while superstitious and suspicious citizens saw a nefarious human plot involved and persecuted certain minority groups among them. Though it is now widely believed that rats and fleas spread the disease by carrying the bubonic plague westward along well-established trade routes, and there are now vaccines to prevent the spread of the plague, the Black Death gruesomely killed upwards of 100 million people, with helpless chroniclers graphically describing the various stages of the disease. It took Europe decades for its population to bounce back, and similar plagues would affect various parts of the world for the next several centuries, but advances in medical technology have since allowed researchers to read various medieval accounts of the Black Death in order to understand the various strains of the disease. Furthermore, the social upheaval caused by the plague radically changed European societies, and some have noted that by the time the plague had passed, the Late Middle Ages would end with many of today's European nations firmly established. The Black Death: The History and Legacy of the Middle Ages' Deadliest Plague chronicles the origins and spread of a plague that decimated Europe and may have wiped out over a third of the continent's population. Along with pictures and a bibliography, you will learn about the Black Death like never before, in no time at all.

Die Pest

Die Pest PDF Book Detail:
Author: Paul Slack
Publisher: Reclam Verlag
ISBN: 3159607887
Size: 33.23 MB
Format: PDF
Category : History
Languages : de
Pages : 192
View: 1548

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Book Description: "Beulenpest"? "Pestilenz" oder gar "Der Schwarze Tod"? Die Pest hat viele Namen. Wie diese verheerende Seuche die Menschhheit geprägt hat, darüber schreibt Paul Slack in seinem Buch "Die Pest". Von der Antike über das Mittelalter bis heute zeichnet er nach, wie die Pest ganze Bevölkerungen an den Rand der Ausrottung brachte und welche Auswirkungen das auf die betroffenen Gesellschaften hatte.

The Black Death

The Black Death PDF Book Detail:
Author: Charles River Charles River Editors
Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 9781543275339
Size: 77.43 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 48
View: 5631

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Book Description: *Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the plague written by survivors across Europe *Includes a bibliography for further reading "The trend of recent research is pointing to a figure more like 45-50% of the European population dying during a four-year period. There is a fair amount of geographic variation. In Mediterranean Europe, areas such as Italy, the south of France and Spain, where plague ran for about four years consecutively, it was probably closer to 75-80% of the population. In Germany and England ... it was probably closer to 20%.." - Philip Daileader, medieval historian If it is true that nothing succeeds like success, then it is equally true that nothing challenges like change. People have historically been creatures of habit and curiosity at the same time, two parts of the human condition that constantly conflict with each other. This has always been true, but at certain moments in history it has been abundantly true, especially during the mid-14th century, when a boon in exploration and travel came up against a fear of the unknown. Together, they both introduced the Black Death to Europe and led to mostly incorrect attempts to explain it. The Late Middle Ages had seen a rise in Western Europe's population in previous centuries, but these gains were almost entirely erased as the plague spread rapidly across all of Europe from 1346-1353. With a medieval understanding of medicine, diagnosis, and illness, nobody understood what caused Black Death or how to truly treat it. As a result, many religious people assumed it was divine retribution, while superstitious and suspicious citizens saw a nefarious human plot involved and persecuted certain minority groups among them. Though it is now widely believed that rats and fleas spread the disease by carrying the bubonic plague westward along well-established trade routes, and there are now vaccines to prevent the spread of the plague, the Black Death gruesomely killed upwards of 100 million people, with helpless chroniclers graphically describing the various stages of the disease. It took Europe decades for its population to bounce back, and similar plagues would affect various parts of the world for the next several centuries, but advances in medical technology have since allowed researchers to read various medieval accounts of the Black Death in order to understand the various strains of the disease. Furthermore, the social upheaval caused by the plague radically changed European societies, and some have noted that by the time the plague had passed, the Late Middle Ages would end with many of today's European nations firmly established. The Black Death: The History and Legacy of the Middle Ages' Deadliest Plague chronicles the origins and spread of a plague that decimated Europe and may have wiped out over a third of the continent's population. Along with pictures and a bibliography, you will learn about the Black Death like never before, in no time at all.

Die Pest

Die Pest PDF Book Detail:
Author: Albert Camus
Publisher:
ISBN: 9783518017715
Size: 53.69 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : French fiction
Languages : de
Pages : 317
View: 540

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Book Description: Die Katastrophe einer algerischen Stadt als Symbol des gesamtmenschlichen Daseins

The Great Plague Of London

The Great Plague of London PDF Book Detail:
Author: Charles River
Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 9781545127049
Size: 72.28 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 48
View: 2596

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Book Description: *Includes pictures *Includes contemporary accounts of the plague *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading "The trend of recent research is pointing to a figure more like 45-50% of the European population dying during a four-year period. There is a fair amount of geographic variation. In Mediterranean Europe, areas such as Italy, the south of France and Spain, where plague ran for about four years consecutively, it was probably closer to 75-80% of the population. In Germany and England ... it was probably closer to 20%." - Philip Daileader, medieval historian In the 14th century, a ruthless killer stalked the streets of England, wiping out up to 60% of the terror-stricken nation's inhabitants. This invisible and unforgiving terminator continued to harass the population for hundreds of years, but nothing could compare to the savagery it would unleash 3 centuries later. This conscienceless menace was none other than the notorious bubonic plague, also known as the "Black Death." The High Middle Ages had seen a rise in Western Europe's population in previous centuries, but these gains were almost entirely erased as the plague spread rapidly across all of Europe from 1346-1353. With a medieval understanding of medicine, diagnosis, and illness, nobody understood what caused Black Death or how to truly treat it. As a result, many religious people assumed it was divine retribution, while superstitious and suspicious citizens saw a nefarious human plot involved and persecuted certain minority groups among them. Though it is now widely believed that rats and fleas spread the disease by carrying the bubonic plague westward along well-established trade routes, and there are now vaccines to prevent the spread of the plague, the Black Death gruesomely killed upwards of 100 million people, with helpless chroniclers graphically describing the various stages of the disease. It took Europe decades for its population to bounce back, and similar plagues would affect various parts of the world for the next several centuries, but advances in medical technology have since allowed researchers to read various medieval accounts of the Black Death in order to understand the various strains of the disease. Furthermore, the social upheaval caused by the plague radically changed European societies, and some have noted that by the time the plague had passed, the Late Middle Ages would end with many of today's European nations firmly established. In the mid-17th century, the heart of England fell victim to the mother of all epidemic catastrophes. The city of London was a ghost town, deserted by those who knew better than to hang around in a breeding ground that offered near-certain doom. Those who were confined within the city's borders had to make do with what they had, and the pitifully low morale seemed appropriate; the reek of rot and decomposition pervaded the air day in and day out, while corpses, young and old, riddled with strange swellings and blackened boils, littered the streets. For Londoners, to say it was hell would be an understatement. The Great Plague of London: The History and Legacy of England's Last Major Outbreak of the Bubonic Plague explores the horrific disaster, its origins, the peculiar precautions and curious cures designed to combat the disease, and the sobering legacy it has left behind. Along with pictures depicting important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Great Plague of London like never before.

Der Ferne Spiegel

Der ferne Spiegel PDF Book Detail:
Author: Barbara Tuchman
Publisher: Pantheon Verlag
ISBN: 3641052076
Size: 56.58 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category : History
Languages : de
Pages : 752
View: 1756

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Book Description: Ein moderner Klassiker der Geschichtsschreibung Bestsellerautorin Barbara Tuchman schuf mit »Der ferne Spiegel« einen modernen Klassiker der Geschichtsschreibung. Mit sicherem und kundigem Blick für die »große« politische Geschichte und feinem Gespür für die Alltags- und Mentalitätsgeschichte gelingt es ihr, das pralle Leben im dramatischen 14. Jahrhundert und damit im Herbst des Mittelalters einzufangen. Im Mittelpunkt von Barbara Tuchmans faszinierender Schilderung des 14. Jahrhunderts steht die Lebensgeschichte des französischen Adeligen Enguerrand de Coucy VII. Im zarten Alter von 15 Jahren zieht Coucy das erste Mal als Ritter in die Schlacht, erlebt den Hundertjährigen Krieg hautnah mit und wird schließlich vom englischen König als Geisel genommen. Coucy wird im Laufe seines Lebens Zeuge dramatischer, ja scheinbar apokalyptischer Ereignisse: Die Pest sucht Europa heim, religiöse Fanatiker hetzen die Menschen auf, Papst und Gegenpapst bekriegen sich, auf Frankreichs Thron sitzt ein Wahnsinniger, und im Osten rücken die Osmanen vor. Gleichzeitig kannten die Kreativität und das Kunstschaffen der Menschen nun, gleichsam auf der Schwelle vom Mittelalter zur Neuzeit, keine Grenzen. Boccaccio schuf sein epochemachendes Werk Decamerone, Giotto bereitete in Italien den Weg für die Renaissance und in ganz Europa entstanden Kathedralen von ungekannter Größe und Pracht.

Daily Life During The Black Death

Daily Life During the Black Death PDF Book Detail:
Author: Joseph Patrick Byrne
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780313332975
Size: 54.22 MB
Format: PDF
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 326
View: 5452

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Book Description: Provides an overview of daily life during the time of the plague that devastated fourteenth-century Europe and looks at the impact of the plague on people's activities in such settings as the doctor's office, the home, city hall, and on the roads.